Star Wars v. Rebel Indie

Yellow Day in Theaters JANUARY 8TH!


The Star Wars Empire v. One Unknown Rebel Indie
by GP Galle Jr.

Yep, I was one of those kids. An early eighties kid fortunate enough to live the dream of being there when Star Wars first arrived. Our playgrounds were ripe with reenactments; we got the toys fresh off the assembly line for Christmas, and broke in our Fisher Price record players replaying this new American mythology. I was Luke for Halloween. My first drawings, long before I was in animation and film, were of Luke and Vader.

Animated Good Man holding spear

We kids took this golden age of film for granted, not knowing it was a rare time. Legends were being made. Spielberg with his budget-busting Jaws, almost by accident, invented the summer blockbuster. An unknown Stallone broke the drama feel-good mold with the Oscar-winning Rocky. Lucas bet everything on the tough-to-describe space-fantasy Star Wars to make history. Bold visionary rebels reinventing the industry.

“In some ironic twist of fate, the very films that broke the mold are the framework within which our current films must operate.”

Forty years later these innovations are franchise empires with boardrooms, marketing formulas, billion dollar budgets, and standard scripts. In some ironic twist of fate, the very films that broke the mold are the framework within which our current films must operate. Very rare it is to have a new film or concept on the horizon. Why create something new and risky when you can sell a lunchbox just as easily with an old franchise?

But even better, what about combining forces?

Good Man and Little Girl walk, cross behind

Like two of the most innovative brands, George Lucas and Walt Disney, being absorbed into a giant corporation to rule the galaxy together, more machine than man now. The Disney Corporation empire (who also ate Pixar and Marvel), now looming toward Christmas with its newest prize possession, The Force Awakens. Records smash with seemingly effortless power. The crowds are off the wall crazy. Heck, we could put Harrison Ford on a coffee creamer bottle and it would sell. Nostalgia baby, that’s where it’s at!

No one would dare challenge the Disney Star Wars Empire!

Well, there’s one.

“Crammed in between Oscar Contenders, Star Wars… is a little indie, putting itself out there like the films of old.”

Crammed in between Oscar contenders, Star Wars, and Alvin and the Chipmunks is a little indie, putting itself out there like the films of old. Yellow Day is an original story, quality, innovative, off-the-wall, spectacle rich, and resonating incredibly well with families. It is not a festival movie or a darling of the critics. It is not a franchise. And interestingly the only holiday movie focused on positive, affirming, and community service driven stories.

David Michael receives award, platform

But before you start calling the Hallmark Channel, there is more. Yellow Day is something different than the jam packed world of elevator pitches and laser-targeted linear narratives. It is non-linear, allegorical, and at heart a philosophical work, something more akin to an 18th century fairytale than a modern popcorn film. The result is a work purposed for multiple viewings, something for kids to grow up with. And it is not dark like Burton or del Toro. Nope, it is almost sugar-sweet bright, actually.

“Yellow Day is something different than the jam packed world of elevator pitches and laser-targeted linear narratives.”

Something new? What a risk!

Admittedly it is. However, Yellow Day was screened for over 1,000 people across the country, and was greeted with cheers, quotes, and an average rating of 9/10. This little unknown indie has been building momentum; ahem, a rebel alliance if you will.

And now Yellow Day is on a one-way crash course with the largest Christmas Day movie release in cinema history.

That’s the stuff movies are made of.

Animated RW Baker and Butterfly edited

So is Yellow Day going to destroy the evil empire called Star Wars? No. Our massive, crazy large franchises have their place. In many ways Star Wars and Superman are the lifeblood of American culture, representing our values, our ideas, and ideals. They are not evil, but they are gobbling up film real estate.

“We need room for risk-taking stories, new ideas, and mold-breaking movies again.”

And we are not just a consumer nation, but also a nation of innovation, risk, and heart. We need room for risk-taking stories, new ideas, and mold-breaking movies again. And hopefully Yellow Day can open some doors for this kind of innovative storytelling, innovation not just living in the arthouses of adult-themed films. We can risk in the children’s market too, just like Lewis Carroll, J.M. Barry, and of course, Uncle Walt did once upon a time.

So for Christmas, after you’re on your fifth view of Star Wars, check out Yellow Day.

Merry Christmas, from Yellow Day.

Kyle Bedwell

Kyle Bedwell is a former teacher turned screenwriter and director. He loves his wife, Liverpool FC, and the journey his Creator has placed him on.

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